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"Today we often forget that prior to World War II, every city in America was built for easy walking and biking. In fact, the idea of living in a walkable place is nothing radical. What was radical was the program we undertook to build an entirely new type of human life. We built networks of roadways and freeways like nothing any society had ever seen before. We tore down entire neighborhoods to accommodate these roads as well as the parking lots and garages required by the cars that would travel these roads; at the same time, we ripped out the tracks for streetcars and trains."

Kevin Klinkenberg on the journey we’ve taken to create unwalkable cities.  (via thisbigcity)

(via urbanresolve)

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New York City Townhouses Sawyer Berson Architects

via thenewurbanist:

(Source: sawyerberson.com, via urbanresolve)

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"It makes little sense to expect our homeownership rates to rebound to what they were before the housing crisis. We need to accept the fact that the housing system we have today and will have tomorrow will have to be different from the one we had in the past."

The ‘Great Reset,’ Continued (via thisiscitylab)

(via goingurban)

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Here’s where young people are (and aren’t moving after graduation)

Traditional meccas for young, highly educated people like New York and Los Angeles are still growing in population (mainly through increased immigration), but are now seeing a net loss of Americans of all education levels.
Instead, the cities that are attracting a coveted educated workforce are “knowledge and tech hubs like San Francisco, Austin, Seattle and Denver, and also Sun Belt metros like Phoenix, Charlotte and Miami.”
Read more | Follow policymic


via newurbanismfilmfestival & policymic:

Here’s where young people are (and aren’t moving after graduation)

Traditional meccas for young, highly educated people like New York and Los Angeles are still growing in population (mainly through increased immigration), but are now seeing a net loss of Americans of all education levels.

Instead, the cities that are attracting a coveted educated workforce are “knowledge and tech hubs like San Francisco, Austin, Seattle and Denver, and also Sun Belt metros like Phoenix, Charlotte and Miami.”

Read more | Follow policymic

via newurbanismfilmfestival & policymic:

(Source: micdotcom)

"We need to stop building bad places. We don’t need to build Rome or Paris. We just need to stop building Houston."

Eight Steps To Improve Urbanism | Streets MN, 7/26/2014 (via atlurbanist)

ICD/ITKE RESEARCH PAVILLON 2013-14 / ICD/ITKE

via redmarks:

(via landscapearchitecture)

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That’s a lot of grass. Just imagine what could be done with all that space!
Have your own #citydata you’d like to share with the world?  Send it our way! 
via thisbigcity:

That’s a lot of grass. Just imagine what could be done with all that space!

Have your own #citydata you’d like to share with the world?  Send it our way

via thisbigcity:

(via urbnist)

Fabergé Fractals - Tom Beddard

Laser physicist and web designer Tom Beddard has been working toward his opus - Fractal Lab - a 3D fractal renderer capable of producing complex fractals in real time. 

A year ago, Beddard released a video animation featuring a constantly shapeshifting form that transitions between different fractal designs. See it here: http://vimeo.com/18842873

His latest series: Fabergé Fractals features full colour designs of stunning complexity and gorgeous detail.

Images sourced from: Visual News

via thecreativesense:

(Source: thecreativesense, via wildcat2030)

Fibonacci you crazy bastard….

As seen in the solar system (by no ridiculous coincidence), Earth orbits the Sun 8 times in the same period that Venus orbits the Sun 13 times! Drawing a line between Earth & Venus every week results in a spectacular FIVE side symmetry!!

Lets bring up those Fibonacci numbers again: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34..

So if we imagine planets with Fibonacci orbits, do they create Fibonacci symmetries?!

You bet!! Depicted here is a:

  • 2 sided symmetry (5 orbits x 3 orbits)
  • 3 sided symmetry (8 orbits x 5 orbits)
  • sided symmetry (13 orbits x 8 orbits) - like Earth & Venus
  • sided symmetry (21 orbits x 13 orbits)

I wonder if relationships like this exist somewhere in the universe….

Read the Book    |    Follow    |    Hi-Res    -2-    -3-    -5-    -8-

via underthesymmetree:

(via parametricworld)

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"Just because cars have lasted a century, that does not mean they’re here to stay, that does not mean they’re not ripe for disruption. Cars are the newspapers of today. Something oldsters can’t live without and youngsters can."

Bob Lefsetz questioning the future role of the automobile in Kid’s Don’t Care About Cars. (via cadenced)

(Source: spatiallyobvious, via archimess)



Secret formula for a boost in cycling: infrastructure + a crappy drive
After reading this post about a sudden cycling surge in Copenhagen, I think Atlanta has a great chance at getting a boost in cycling activity. Why? Because it turns out that the formula for getting that boost = great cycling infrastructure + being a really crappy place to drive. 
We’ve already got one of those down pat! Now we just need to add the cycling infrastructure. Seriously, if we had an extensive network of protected bike lanes in Atlanta, it’s a cinch that masses of in-towners would gladly get out of the car traffic and start pedaling. 
AND SPEAK OF THE DEVIL…
The Atlanta Bicycle Coalition points on on their website that we actually have a good opportunity in Atlanta right now to help “add up to 100 miles of comfortable and connected bikeways in Atlanta.” All we need is to get the city to devote 15% of a proposed $250 million infrastructure bond toward the construction of new bike lanes. 
ABC asks that you attend one of the following meetings on the bond to let your voice be heard:
July 8 from 6-8 pm: Atlanta City Hall Auditorium (Old Council Chambers) 68 Mitchell Street 
July 15 from 6-8 pm: Charles R Drew Charter School in East Lake/Kirkwood
July 16 from 6-8 pm: 1705 Commerce Drive Atlanta, GA 30314
Read more about it on the ABC website.
Photo of Atlanta cyclist from Tumbr user naoyawada

via climateadaptation & atlurbanist:

Secret formula for a boost in cycling: infrastructure + a crappy drive

After reading this post about a sudden cycling surge in Copenhagen, I think Atlanta has a great chance at getting a boost in cycling activity. Why? Because it turns out that the formula for getting that boost = great cycling infrastructure + being a really crappy place to drive. 

We’ve already got one of those down pat! Now we just need to add the cycling infrastructure. Seriously, if we had an extensive network of protected bike lanes in Atlanta, it’s a cinch that masses of in-towners would gladly get out of the car traffic and start pedaling. 

AND SPEAK OF THE DEVIL…

The Atlanta Bicycle Coalition points on on their website that we actually have a good opportunity in Atlanta right now to help “add up to 100 miles of comfortable and connected bikeways in Atlanta.” All we need is to get the city to devote 15% of a proposed $250 million infrastructure bond toward the construction of new bike lanes. 

ABC asks that you attend one of the following meetings on the bond to let your voice be heard:

  • July 8 from 6-8 pm: Atlanta City Hall Auditorium (Old Council Chambers) 68 Mitchell Street 
  • July 15 from 6-8 pm: Charles R Drew Charter School in East Lake/Kirkwood
  • July 16 from 6-8 pm: 1705 Commerce Drive Atlanta, GA 30314

Read more about it on the ABC website.

Photo of Atlanta cyclist from Tumbr user naoyawada

via climateadaptation & atlurbanist:

"As sexy as brainstorming is, with people popping like champagne with ideas, what actually happens is when one person is talking you’re not thinking of your own ideas."

Brainstorming Doesn’t Work; Try This Technique Instead (via fastcompany)

(via fastcompany)

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"Why’re you taking a picture of the building? It’s fucking ugly."
With those words, a construction worker greeted me last Thursday as I approached the entrance to David Adjaye's Sugar Hill development, on the site of a former brownfield on West 155th and Saint Nicholas Avenue in West Harlem.
Some of New York City’s poorest residents will start moving into the 13-story, neo-brutalist housing complex in August. It’s a building that Mayor Bill de Blasio referred to as the ”epitome of everything we want to do with housing across the spectrum of incomes.”
While many applaud the purpose behind the new building, which will also have an early-education center and a children’s museum, few seem to think much of its design. "It has nothing to do with the rest of the neighborhood," said another worker on site. "Nobody likes it."

-Is West Harlem’s Most Inventive New Building Also Its Ugliest?
viathisiscitylab:

"Why’re you taking a picture of the building? It’s fucking ugly."

With those words, a construction worker greeted me last Thursday as I approached the entrance to David Adjaye's Sugar Hill development, on the site of a former brownfield on West 155th and Saint Nicholas Avenue in West Harlem.

Some of New York City’s poorest residents will start moving into the 13-story, neo-brutalist housing complex in August. It’s a building that Mayor Bill de Blasio referred to as the epitome of everything we want to do with housing across the spectrum of incomes.”

While many applaud the purpose behind the new building, which will also have an early-education center and a children’s museum, few seem to think much of its design. "It has nothing to do with the rest of the neighborhood," said another worker on site. "Nobody likes it."

-Is West Harlem’s Most Inventive New Building Also Its Ugliest?

viathisiscitylab:

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Gavin named a KANSAS! Creator of Culture

image

Hufft Projects is a design collective. Our studio combines all sorts of creative people from diverse backgrounds, people who are comfortable filling many roles. Gavin Snider is one of these creative types. Operating under the catch-all title of designer, Gavin tackles architecture, graphic design, blogging, PR and marketing here at Hufft Projects. Outside of the office, you may have seen him wandering the streets, pen in one hand and a sketchbook in the other. He stops to draw historic buildings and modern architecture, grain elevators and railroad tracks, rolling hills, open skies and the occasional sea monster. His architectural experience and illustrations inform one another. 

Read More

via hufftprojects: