STUDIO 630

Studio630 is the research blog of Kyle Rogler. This blog posts articles of work in architecture, urban design, technology, culture, and programming that currently influence me. Currently stationed at BNIM Architects.
Recent Tweets @Studio630

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 

more here

via thisbigcity:

Our perception of art, they found, is largely dictated by the amount of time and effort we think went into it.

Political Polarization in the American Public

Republicans and Democrats are more divided along ideological lines – and partisan antipathy is deeper and more extensive – than at any point in the last two decades. These trends manifest themselves in myriad ways, both in politics and in everyday life. And a new survey of 10,000 adults nationwide finds that these divisions are greatest among those who are the most engaged and active in the political process.

Full Story: Pew

via emergentfutures:

In the United States, our findings indicate, the majority does not rule. When a majority of citizens disagrees with economic elites and/or with organized interests, they generally lose. Moreover, because of the strong status quo bias built into the U.S. political system, even when fairly large majorities of Americans favor policy change, they generally do not get it.
Is Democracy dead in the USA? Martin Gilens and Benjamin J. Page think so. (via thisbigcity)

(via thisbigcity)

by Andy Singer

via ppsLevels of Service and Travel Projections: The Wrong Tools for Planning Our Streets? 

via citymaus:

The Fear Sustaining Sustainable Urbanism

Over the past decade, architects have found themselves increasingly commissioned to design districts, neighbourhoods, economic free zones and even entire new cities: a phenomenon that has been accompanied by a commitment to ‘sustainability’, which now seem inseparable from urban design itself. While ‘’ remains a vague concept at best, it nonetheless presents itself with a sense of urgency similar to that which galvanised many of the great movements of modern architecture vis-a-vis the city. Underlying such urgency is a rhetorical reference to a collective fear of some palpable sort, whether it be fear of revolution (Le Corbusier), fear of cultural tabula rasa (Jane Jacobs, Team X) or our new fear: ecological collapse. It is obvious that the myriad ‘eco’ projects that have popped up all around the world would not be viable if not for the fact that they appear against a background of imminent catastrophe – a condition of terrifying proportions. Yet the essence of this fear is far from clear. Indeed, in light of ecological catastrophe and amidst any fetish for windmills or vegetation, architects have cultivated what seems to be a curious nostalgia for the present – a pragmatism whose lack of patience for the past seeks a kind of reconstitution of the present in imagining any future. So if not for climate mayhem, what is the true nature of fear that lies at the core of today’s urban project, ‘ecological urbanism’?

another article summarizing transportation x urbanization x climate change x advocacy x urban planning.

Transportation is the largest single source of air pollution in the United States. According to the Union of Concerned Scientists, fine particulate matter alone, much of which comes from transportation related emissions, is responsible for up to 30,000 premature deaths each year. Yet transportation is one of the areas that we, as individuals, have the most ability to control. A whopping 60% of carbon emissions generated by transportation in this country originates from cars and light trucks (the remainder mainly from heavy-duty vehicles & airplanes). The average person who bikes five miles to work, five days a week, avoids 2,000 miles of driving a year – the equivalent of 100 gallons of gasoline saved and 2,000 pound of CO2 emissions avoided. This equates to saving 5% of the average American’s carbon footprint. This means that regular people like you and me have the greatest potential to turn this problem around.

Simply put, too many people are burning too much fuel in single-occupancy vehicles. Fortunately, a surprisingly straightforward, inexpensive, and low-tech solution to this problem is right under our noses or, more likely, stored in our garages..

Americans are no different than our friends in northern Europe when it comes to making basic lifestyle choices. How we decide to get to work, bring our kids to school, or move around for errands or recreation is largely based on what’s most convenient and expedient for us personally, not some grand environmental motivation. If it’s easier and faster to drive, we usually do. If transit is most convenient, we take the bus. If biking proves speediest and most enjoyable, then we’ll pedal.

Unfortunately for our environment (as well as our pocketbooks and general health), American communities have largely been built to prioritize automobiles, making it a challenge to see bicycling, transit, or walking trips as the most attractive options in many places.

This is where the work of bicycle advocates can be most effective. Our focus is on improving the policies, plans, and investments needed to make communities bicycle-friendly so that more people have the option of biking for more of their trips.”

by Leah Shahum, sfbike.
read more: stanfordenergyclub, 07.04.14.

via citymaus:

Farming Cuba — A new model for cities and countries facing threats to food security brought on by the end of cheap oil

Following the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, Cuba found itself solely responsible for feeding a nation that had grown dependent on imports and trade subsidies. Citizens began growing their own organic produce anywhere they could find space, on rooftops, balconies, vacant lots, and even school playgrounds. By 1998 there were more than 8,000 urban farms in Havana producing nearly half of the country’s vegetables. What began as a grassroots initiative had, in less than a decade, grown into the largest sustainable agriculture initiative ever undertaken, making Cuba the world leader in urban farming. Learn more in Farming Cuba: Urban Agriculture from the Ground Up, by Carey Clouse, available next week from PAPress.

via papress:

(via urbanresolve)

Ingo Arndt Animal Architecture

Every day, all over the world, animals and insects set about the purposeful tasks of designing their homes, catching their prey, and attracting their mates. In the process they create gorgeous nests, shelters, and habitats. Capturing 120 of these wonders in all their beauty and complexity, Animal Architecture presents a visually arresting tribute to the intersection of nature, science, function, and design.”

via thekhooll:

(via theaccounts)

"Unlike their parents, who calculated their worth in terms of square feet, ultimately inventing the McMansion…this generation is more interested in the amenities of the city itself" — Ellen Dunham-Jones, Georgia Tech professor

via atlurbanist:

(via urbanresolve)

Katharina Roters: Hungarian Cubes

The Magyar Kocka, or Hungarian Cube, is a standardized type of residential house in Hungary that dates back to the 1920s. It was designed as a radically functional single-family home for Budapest’s suburbs and housing projects, but it became closely identified with the postwar communist era, when many villages were rebuilt with uniform rows of single-family homes, and the Hungarian Cube—often renamed the Kádár Kocka, after Hungary’s communist president, János Kádár, became ubiquitous.

In Hungarian Cubes, German-Hungarian artist Katharina Roters explores the one aspect of the Magyar Kocka that could be individualized: the ornamental decorations on their facades. Roters strips the houses she photographs of all surplus details, clearing out fences, railings, antennas, road signs, power lines, and the like, which enables the viewer to focus on the ornaments—and to see how they offered a rare opportunity for individualism and even protest under the conformity of the communist system.

Köszi a tippet, @missingvalues!

pilis cityben is ilyen házak vannak

via redblek & grofjardanhazy:

(via he1ysze11eme)

(via archimess)

Funen, Amsterdam, is located west of Amsterdam’s city centre. Comprised of sixteen newly built apartment blocks and one, continuous courtyard, LANDLAB (landscape architects) and van Dongen-Koschuch (urban design) created a design contrasting the traditional street layout of many Dutch residential neighborhoods. What do you think of the landscaping? Looks like there is a lot of open space, especially in comparison to the surrounding neighborhoods.

via imaginingcities:

A classical question that designers face is whether to provide individual residents with as much green space as possible (tower in the park/suburbs), or do we combine all green space into one larger public space and make a denser city (traditional city and square). This seems like strike a good balance between the two camps. Time will tell if this was a great combination. Any reports from the site be awesome.

(via urbnist)