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Toyo Ito has been announced as the Pritzker laureate for 2013. Ito is the thirty-seventh recipient of the Pritzker Prize and its sixth Japanese recipient.
The Pritzker jury applauded Ito for his ability to synthesize many architectural languages and functionalities in the expression of one personal “syntax,” inspired by the organic structures found in nature and the sensual nature of the human user.
Calling him a “creator of timeless buildings,” the Pritzker Jury further praised Ito for “infusing his designs with a spiritual dimension and for the poetics that transcend all his works.” Among those works, the Jury singled out his Sendai Mediatheque, whose innovative use of structural tubes “permitted new interior spatial qualities,” TOD’S Omotesando building in Tokyo, “where the building skin also serves as structure,” and Tokyo’s Tama Art University Library as particularly inspiring.
In response to the accolade, the highest award in the profession of architecture, Ito humbly expressed that, with each project, he only becomes more “painfully aware of [his] inadequacy, and it turns into energy to challenge the next project.” For that reason, Ito professed, “I will never fix my architectural style and never be satisfied with my works.”

Toyo Ito has been announced as the Pritzker laureate for 2013. Ito is the thirty-seventh recipient of the  and its sixth Japanese recipient.

The Pritzker jury applauded Ito for his ability to synthesize many architectural languages and functionalities in the expression of one personal “syntax,” inspired by the organic structures found in nature and the sensual nature of the human user.

Calling him a “creator of timeless buildings,” the Pritzker Jury further praised Ito for “infusing his designs with a spiritual dimension and for the poetics that transcend all his works.” Among those works, the Jury singled out his Sendai Mediatheque, whose innovative use of structural tubes “permitted new interior spatial qualities,” TOD’S Omotesando building in Tokyo, “where the building skin also serves as structure,” and Tokyo’s Tama Art University Library as particularly inspiring.

In response to the accolade, the highest award in the profession of architecture, Ito humbly expressed that, with each project, he only becomes more “painfully aware of [his] inadequacy, and it turns into energy to challenge the next project.” For that reason, Ito professed, “I will never fix my architectural style and never be satisfied with my works.”

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Toyo Ito: A Conversation on Japanese Architecture

Venice Biennale 2012: Photos of the Japanese Pavilion
Photographer Patricia Parinejad has shared with us her images from the Japanese Pavilion at the 13th Venice Architecture Biennale. Presenting “Architecture. Possible here? Home-for-all”, the exhibition tells the story of three emerging architects collaborating with the exhibit’s curator, Toyo Ito, to design for the Rikuzentakata residents who lost their homes during the devastating 2011 tsunami. “The humanity of this project” impressed the Biennale jury and was awarded the top honor of the Gold Lion.

Venice Biennale 2012: Photos of the Japanese Pavilion

Photographer Patricia Parinejad has shared with us her images from the Japanese Pavilion at the 13th Venice Architecture Biennale. Presenting “Architecture. Possible here? Home-for-all”, the exhibition tells the story of three emerging architects collaborating with the exhibit’s curator, , to design for the Rikuzentakata residents who lost their homes during the devastating 2011 tsunami. “The humanity of this project” impressed the Biennale jury and was awarded the top honor of the Gold Lion.


Architecture Week: Toyo Ito Interview
"If you look at 20th century functionalism, where functions were clearly separate, there was a strict order between establishing all functions separately. Now in 21st century, it’s more of a condition where living and working, playing and working, they are all intermingled. You play while you work, you do your living while you work. So, in this sort of confused condition of contemporary city life, I feel like I want to bring that into my architecture…
I am very interested in what I call a “loose condition,” and I have gained confidence in that concept ever since the Sendai Mediatheque. Traditional libraries have confined rooms where you do your reading and your research. With the Mediatheque we wanted to break that up. Instead of providing secluded rooms, we provide places, and the [individual] chooses whatever places he or she wishes. We also wanted different groups to share space. For example, old people might be in places where young people are, and therefore the old people look at the fashion of the young people and become more fashionable! Or mothers can look after their children and do other stuff as well because they are in the vicinity and they can share the same place. In that sense, giving places rather than rooms has become very meaningful for me.”
~Toyo Ito
Architecture Week Link

Architecture Week: Toyo Ito Interview

"If you look at 20th century functionalism, where functions were clearly separate, there was a strict order between establishing all functions separately. Now in 21st century, it’s more of a condition where living and working, playing and working, they are all intermingled. You play while you work, you do your living while you work. So, in this sort of confused condition of contemporary city life, I feel like I want to bring that into my architecture…

I am very interested in what I call a “loose condition,” and I have gained confidence in that concept ever since the Sendai Mediatheque. Traditional libraries have confined rooms where you do your reading and your research. With the Mediatheque we wanted to break that up. Instead of providing secluded rooms, we provide places, and the [individual] chooses whatever places he or she wishes. We also wanted different groups to share space. For example, old people might be in places where young people are, and therefore the old people look at the fashion of the young people and become more fashionable! Or mothers can look after their children and do other stuff as well because they are in the vicinity and they can share the same place. In that sense, giving places rather than rooms has become very meaningful for me.”

~Toyo Ito

Architecture Week Link

The Reflective Studio: Toyo Ito
“
Toyo Ito is known as a simple and creative architects. through his conversation with architectureweek, master Ito makes every answer seems so simple. He doesn’t like pets much, he prefers to be a baseball player than an architects, he loves to wear simple things than formal shirts and japanese traditional dress, and he enjoy evening time very much to work.
Toyo makes life so easy, as how he brings it in design, to enjoy life and nature. People see his work as light and transparent. Knowing as the architect who work with metaphore theory, he is known as the architect who bring the architecture as the media of communication. As his in Sendai Mediatheque design reviews,
“…..The metaphor “the application of a name or descriptive term of phrase to an object or action to which it is imaginatively but not literally applicable” on which the Sendai mediateque project is based combines natural and artificial concepts in the form of an aquarium “an artificial environment designed for keeping live aquatic plants and animals for study or exhibition, esp. a tank of water with transparent sides” ( Ito, 2001 )
 
In his architecture Ito attempts to introduce the image of progress  “advance or development towards completion, betterment, etc; improvement”, using the most advanced innovation and technology by putting it on display. According to this , he brings Japanese concept of simplicity and minimalism: there are no messages on “screen walls”, the latest trend in Toyo Ito’s buildings for the media “the main means of mass communication (esp. newspapers and broadcasting) regarded collectively”, but it is through transparency that the development of the mediateque on the inside is seen. He also involve the entire environment into his design.

Contemporary architecture, according to Ito, must expand its notions of space and movement to incorporate this second realm of existence. What this translates into is use of state of the art technologies, fluid spaces, buildings that change color by day and by night – in other words, a feast of sensory and physical stimuli, all with down-to-earth practical uses that one almost forgets to appreciate. He is a constant source of revolutionary ideas who has made architecture as much about “soft” spaces as “hard” spaces. Non standard architecture should not be seen as only ” the skin” of the building but how the architect thinks about the philosophy of space and life itself.”
The Reflective Studio Blog

The Reflective Studio: Toyo Ito

Toyo Ito is known as a simple and creative architects. through his conversation with architectureweek, master Ito makes every answer seems so simple. He doesn’t like pets much, he prefers to be a baseball player than an architects, he loves to wear simple things than formal shirts and japanese traditional dress, and he enjoy evening time very much to work.

Toyo makes life so easy, as how he brings it in design, to enjoy life and nature. People see his work as light and transparent. Knowing as the architect who work with metaphore theory, he is known as the architect who bring the architecture as the media of communication. As his in Sendai Mediatheque design reviews,

“…..The metaphor “the application of a name or descriptive term of phrase to an object or action to which it is imaginatively but not literally applicable” on which the Sendai mediateque project is based combines natural and artificial concepts in the form of an aquarium “an artificial environment designed for keeping live aquatic plants and animals for study or exhibition, esp. a tank of water with transparent sides” ( Ito, 2001 )

 


In his architecture Ito attempts to introduce the image of progress  “advance or development towards completion, betterment, etc; improvement”, using the most advanced innovation and technology by putting it on display. According to this , he brings Japanese concept of simplicity and minimalism: there are no messages on “screen walls”, the latest trend in Toyo Ito’s buildings for the media “the main means of mass communication (esp. newspapers and broadcasting) regarded collectively”, but it is through transparency that the development of the mediateque on the inside is seen. He also involve the entire environment into his design.

Contemporary architecture, according to Ito, must expand its notions of space and movement to incorporate this second realm of existence. What this translates into is use of state of the art technologies, fluid spaces, buildings that change color by day and by night – in other words, a feast of sensory and physical stimuli, all with down-to-earth practical uses that one almost forgets to appreciate. He is a constant source of revolutionary ideas who has made architecture as much about “soft” spaces as “hard” spaces. Non standard architecture should not be seen as only ” the skin” of the building but how the architect thinks about the philosophy of space and life itself.”

The Reflective Studio Blog

Architectural Record: New Library, Tama Art University
"With its iconic arches, Toyo Ito’s new library at Tama Art University has the aura of a Romanesque building. But caves, not compression structures, were the architect’s inspiration, so any similarities to European antecedents are merely superficial. And unlike the straightforward, repetitive systems used historically, Ito’s high-tech concrete curves—each one different—tiptoe gracefully in multiple directions throughout the building…
To capitalize on the building’s strategic location, Ito first wanted to submerge the library and top it off with a single-story gathering place where students and professors could cross paths and exhibit their work. But this idea did not go over well with the university administration, which envisioned a conventional 3- or 4-story building with a gallery below. Also, buried infrastructure prevented a full-scale site excavation. Despite these roadblocks, Ito was unwilling to abandon his original concept altogether. So he inverted his underground grotto and turned it into a 60,700-square-foot building with a single, large space on each of its two stories, each one loosely divided into functional zones by arcades.”
Architectural Record Article

Architectural Record: New Library, Tama Art University

"With its iconic arches, Toyo Ito’s new library at Tama Art University has the aura of a Romanesque building. But caves, not compression structures, were the architect’s inspiration, so any similarities to European antecedents are merely superficial. And unlike the straightforward, repetitive systems used historically, Ito’s high-tech concrete curves—each one different—tiptoe gracefully in multiple directions throughout the building…

To capitalize on the building’s strategic location, Ito first wanted to submerge the library and top it off with a single-story gathering place where students and professors could cross paths and exhibit their work. But this idea did not go over well with the university administration, which envisioned a conventional 3- or 4-story building with a gallery below. Also, buried infrastructure prevented a full-scale site excavation. Despite these roadblocks, Ito was unwilling to abandon his original concept altogether. So he inverted his underground grotto and turned it into a 60,700-square-foot building with a single, large space on each of its two stories, each one loosely divided into functional zones by arcades.”

Architectural Record Article

archiCentral: Tama Art University Library

"This is a library for an art university located in the suburbs of Tokyo.  Passing through the main entrance gate, the site lies behind a front garden with small and large trees, and stretches up a gentle slope.

The existing cafeteria was the sole place in the university shared by both students and staff members across all disciplines, so the first impetus for our design was to question how an institution as specialised as a library could provide an open commonality for all.

Our first idea was for a wide open gallery on the ground level that would serve as an active thoroughfare for people crossing the campus, even without intending to go to the library…

The new library is a place where everyone can discover their style of ‘interacting’ with books and film media as if they were walking through a forest or in a cave; a new place of arcade-like spaces where soft mutual relations form by simply passing through; a focal centre where a new sense of creativity begins to spread throughout the art university’s campus.”

archiCentral article